Resources

In 2022, we worked with grassroots activists from over 20 countries to enable them to advocate for menstrual health in their contexts and garner their input, knowledge, and direction so we could drive the global menstrual health narrative.

Definitions

What is menstruation/a period?

Menstruation, or period, is normal vaginal bleeding that occurs as part of a woman’s monthly cycle. Every month, your body prepares for pregnancy. If no pregnancy occurs, the uterus, or womb, sheds its lining. The menstrual blood is partly blood and partly tissue from inside the uterus.

What is period poverty? 

We understand that several terms are used interchangeably within this sector, each with its strengths and weaknesses.
Period poverty is a paradoxical term whereby its use further perpetuates the stigma and shame relating to sub-optimal menstrual health. The time emerged from the global north but has gained traction in the global South.
Our definition is based on the Action Aid (2021) definition. Period poverty affects women, girls and individuals that menstruate worldwide. Access to appropriate and safe period products, safe and hygienic spaces to use them, and the right to manage menstruation without shame or stigma, are essential for menstruating.
What is menstrual health?
In a recent publication, Menstrual Health was defined as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity about the menstrual cycle.

1

educate yourself and teach others

Start by reading the reports and our mission page to know more about period poverty during the covid-19 pandemic and share your knowledge with others so more people can join the movement. 

2

Start a conversation 

to eliminate the stigma surrounding menstruation and period poverty the first step is to start talking about it. Spark up a conversation about menstruation, menstrual health and period poverty or  share our social media posts and graphics. this is a way to get more people to join the conversation and advocate for change.

3

Advocate for change 

Write a letter to your local government or tweet asking for menstrual health to be prioritized during the pandemic.

Educate yourself and teach others

Start by reading the reports and our mission page to know more about period poverty during the covid-19 pandemic and share your knowledge with others so more people can join the movement.

Start a conversation

to eliminate the stigma surrounding menstruation and period poverty the first step is to start talking about it. Spark up a conversation about menstruation, menstrual health and period poverty or  share our social media posts and graphics. this is a way to get more people to join the conversation and advocate for change.

Advocate for change

Write a letter to your local government or tweet asking for menstrual health to be prioritised during the pandemic.

It’s essential to avoid making assumptions about what people need, so we work with various stakeholders to co-develop tools, events, and advocacy initiatives that can be adapted by grassroots activists!
 

You can download a template Letter to Government to send to your Minister of Health, Minister of Equality, Minister of Women, or Local Councillor that asks them to prioritise menstrual health policies.

We have also curated several global discussions focusing on the intersection of menstrual health and several prominent global health topics, such as universal health coverage, gender-based violence, human rights, and women’s leadership. You can watch these events on our YouTube channel. 

Graphics to share in social media

Gifs

External Resources and Reports

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our generation equality forum commitment

We pledge to drive collective action around Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5 to achieve gender equality to empower all women and girls and facilitate efforts that ensure that all girls and women can manage their periods with dignity to achieve SDG 3 of good health and well-being.
Eight hundred million individuals are menstruating each day, yet menstruation is not always recognised as a priority in women’s, girls, transmen and non-binary individuals’ health and well-being. Through our global collective, we will continue to raise the visibility of sub-optimal menstrual health. Through creative storytelling and action-orientated advocacy, we will advocate for safe, affordable, and hygienic products, discreet spaces, and hygiene facilities so women, girls, and all people that menstruate can manage their periods with dignity.
Pandemic Periods will commit to advocating for menstrual health to be recognised independently of sexual and reproductive rights – we want multilateral to have teams dedicated to menstrual health, not just sexual and reproductive health. We also pledge to advocate for menstrual health across the life course, not just for adolescent girls.
We are committed to advocating for girls and women’s needs, and their involvement should be integrated into the co-design and execution of advocacy initiatives, interventions, and gender transformative approaches that address menstrual health in the context of COVID-19 and in the future.
We will work with employers worldwide to encourage them to adopt gender-transformative policies that will create gender-responsive workplaces that address the needs of individuals that menstruate across the life course.
We will also continue to support young women to gain further experience in this sector by offering training and exposure to global health, menstrual health, and gender equality advocacy.